Newest 'wallet-recovery' Questions - Bitcoin Stack Exchange

I exchanged my bitcoin from coinbase with cake wallet 2 hours ago and my cake wallet is still empty

Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaa. Im gonna assume its just slow.
But i also want to turn it back into bitcoin because no one takes monero.
Is it going to take another year
submitted by bigNlGtwentynine to darknet [link] [comments]

I bought 68 bitcoin years ago, found out the price skyrocketed for them but now my wallet is empty.

Long story short, I used an electrum wallet years ago. I know I was trying to buy something off the dark net off alphabay.
The first date shows when I bought the bitcoin. It says balance was 68.818. Then the next day it says -68.818. I don't know where I sent it to since it was so long ago but I have passwords written down in a notebook I found from back then with the different markets and sites.
What should I do? I never bought anything.
submitted by aon7uuwrun to darknet [link] [comments]

Just opened my blockchain wallet, I got $62 in bitcoin cash, I never even used it, and my history is empty. Is this a christmas gift from daddy satoshi?

Just opened my blockchain wallet, I got $62 in bitcoin cash, I never even used it, and my history is empty. Is this a christmas gift from daddy satoshi? submitted by nadiahamilton to btc [link] [comments]

How do I know my bitcoin wallet is actually working?

Hey Reddit! New to Bitcoin mining and I have been mining off 3 GPU's for about 2 days now. I am getting 'Confirmed balances' on my mining pool website but my bitcoin wallet is empty. Is there something i'm missing?
submitted by bebooba11 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Are businesses/shops in the UK using bitcoin?

I'm fairly new to the whole bitcoin hype but I'm loving it so far, after doing a bit of research, downloading a wallet app and creating a changetip account. After browsing for a while, I noticed there's a few posts about shops around the world which accept bitcoin as a currency. I found this interesting, as although my (bitcoin) wallet is empty I'd love to start using it as a sort-of physical currency in the future, but I've seen a lack of posts about bitcoins being used in the UK. Does anyone know anything about this? If so, where have you seen these places? Thanks!
submitted by Leeroythezombie to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Just opened my blockchain wallet, I got $62 in bitcoin cash, I never even used it, and my history is empty. Is this a christmas gift from daddy satoshi?

Just opened my blockchain wallet, I got $62 in bitcoin cash, I never even used it, and my history is empty. Is this a christmas gift from daddy satoshi? submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

If I transferred my BTC 2 weeks ago to another wallet and no longer have the private keys to the original wallet (which is now empty), can I still claim Bitcoin Gold?

So 2 weeks ago I sold half my bitcoin holdings and transferred the other half to a new paper wallet. I stupidly ditched the old paper wallet (which is now empty) but I am wondering if I can claim my Bitcoin Gold still? Does the value carry over or is it stuck on the old wallet?
submitted by danboy4 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

My wallet is empty after deleting a transaction? /r/Bitcoin

My wallet is empty after deleting a transaction? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: I bought 68 bitcoin years ago, found out the price skyrocketed for them but now my wallet is empty. /r/darknet

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: I bought 68 bitcoin years ago, found out the price skyrocketed for them but now my wallet is empty. /darknet submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Blockchain.info: My wallet is empty, but also my latest activity is load loading and all my transaction history is gone. /r/Bitcoin

Blockchain.info: My wallet is empty, but also my latest activity is load loading and all my transaction history is gone. /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Farming, Basic Arithmetic, and you

I have written this guide to dispel a common misconception I hear from this community - that putting more than one Graphics Card in your Bitcoin Farm is a great idea.
TLDR: The FIRST graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 20 hours. Every additional graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 333.33 hours. This information is misstated on the wiki and in many videos I've seen.
More Complicated Maths TLDR from u/Mekhazzio :
TLDR: The bitcoin farm has a base production rate that's much higher than the rate added by each additional graphics cards. So when investing, you shouldn't be looking at how fast the whole farm pays itself off, but how much time it takes your N>1 graphics cards to each pay for themselves, because otherwise you could have just been pocketing the pure profit from the base production rate the whole time.
At current therapist/flea-FiR values:
That is to say, adding a GPU to an already-running farm takes three weeks before you've stopped losing money on that GPU.

A pretty simple formula is utilized to determine Bitcoin Farming output. The payback period for your first graphics card is around 3 days. For each additional graphics card that you put in the payback period is over 20 days. The reason that this has confused so many people is that they credit the production from Graphics Card 1 to the payback period for the rest of the Graphics Cards.
Caveat 1: Escape from Tarkov is a video game and, at least for us players, not a business. Many video game players are completionists, and I will not begrudge anyone who wants to max out every single part of their hideout because it will feel like an achievement. This guide discusses the impact of bitcoin farming on your PMC's wallet. If you find utility in maxing out the bitcoin farm for the feeling of completion then you should do it and probably just close this guide and not worry about it.
Caveat 2: This guide will not address people who hatchet run or pistol run to put graphics cards in their secure container that will usually end up being non-FIR. There are too many variables (spawn rate, survival rate, replacement value of just doing normal Tarkov raids instead of hatchet runs) to do a decent analysis. If you end up with non-FIR graphics cards you should put them in your Bitcoin Farm.
Analysis:
The formula for bitcoin generation is as follows:
Let's simplify some unnecessary constants and make this look more like a normal mathematical function. All we have to do is multiply (1/49) * (0.15) to get this, which is equivalent and much easier to understand:
Now, let's get some ground rules for investment:
Caveat 3: Prices may change, blah blah blah, unless the IRL bitcoin market crashes the conclusions from this guide will still be accurate for the most part.
I will also note that I'm not going to include the cost for fuel needed for production. Because you can craft expeditionary fuel into mag boxes, as well as do other crafts on your workbench and med station while you have the power on, this cost is negligible. Furthermore, since my thesis is that putting more graphics cards in is not worth it, the fact is that I can prove this mathematically without even accounting for the entire cost category of fuel only strengthens my argument.
Using these assumed prices, let's take a look at some different cases.
Case 1:
Building a Bitcoin Generator and putting a single graphics card in.
To calculate cost, we add the cost of building the empty generator (300k) to the single graphics card (250k) to get 550k rouble investment.
Lets calculate revenue using our formula before:BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (1 Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (0)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05
So we're generating 5% of a bitcoin every hour which means we'll get a bitcoin from our farm every 20 hours.
So, every 20 hours we are generating a product worth ~150k. Since we invested ~550k we need to sell:
550k investment / 150k roubles per bitcoin = 3.66 physical bitcoins in order to recoup our investment
Since we can't harvest bitcoins until they are full, we actually need to wait until we get 4 bitcoins at which point we'll be making a slight profit. Generating 4 bitcoins will take 4 bitcoins * 20 hours per bitcoin = 80 hours or a little more than 3 days.
Case 2:
Adding a second graphics card to our bitcoin farm.
Now, as discussed above I'm not worried about non-FIR graphics cards that you hatchet ran to find. If you have an FIR graphics card then you can sell it on the flea market for the 250k price that I'm using as an assumption above.
This concept is called opportunity cost and if you don't understand it I will troll you in the comments: Putting an FIR graphics card into your bitcoin farm is the same as purchasing one off of the flea market and putting it in your bitcoin farm because you had the opportunity to just sell your FIR graphics card for the same price that you can buy it.
With that out of the way, let's do some math on our 2 graphics card bitcoin farm:
BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (2 Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * 1BTC Generated per Hour = 0.053
So, for the cost of 250k roubles we have increased our bitcoin per hour generation by 0.003.
The first graphics card that we added to our bitcoin farm generates us one bitcoin every 20 hours, as discussed above.
The second graphics card that we added to our bitcoin farm generates 0.003 bitcoins per hour. To calculate how many hours this takes to get 1 bitcoin we do the math of 1 / 0.003 = 333.33 hours. 333.33 hours / 24 hours per day is 13.88 or roughly 14 days.
In order to recoup our investment from the 250k roubles we used to get our second graphics card we divide 250k roubles invested by 150k roubles per bitcoin = 1.66 bitcoins. We generate one bitcoin every 14 days, so we can multiply 14 days * 1.66 bitcoins = 23 days.
This math will hold true for every additional graphics card because the function is linear.
Thus, the payback period for your 250k investment in adding a graphics card past the first one to your bitcoin farm is 23 days.
To reiterate: The FIRST graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 20 hours. Every additional graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 333.33 hours.
submitted by Death4Chairman20x70 to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

ALL FUNDS DISAPPEARED AGAIN

SOLVED Hi, so recently I sent money from bitcoin to XMR using changelly. It said the money has sent and they sent me the hash of it sending. However, the xmr didn’t show up in my wallet. I was suggested to reset my wallet so I did just that using the wallet height and wallet seed BUT NOW NONE OF MY FUNDS ARE SHOWING UP! Was I meant to select a wallet location when trying to restart my wallet? The correct address is showing up it’s just saying it’s empty and no transactions are showing up. Please help!!! SOLVED
submitted by KettiSam2000 to monerosupport [link] [comments]

My invoice in WHM was canceled before my Monero could arrive because it’s been over 180 minutes and I can’t see it in my wallet. Did I lost my coins ?

Hey, so I wanted to order heroin on WHM. I always use Morphtoken to swap my bitcoins to monero. Never had any problems with it until today. So for some reason when I was sending my Bitcoin it took very long to get it confirmed and I also know that morph takes there time. It’s about 10 hours ago that i ordered and wanted to check WHM if everything went fine and I saw that my invoice/order was canceled because they didn’t receive payment. I got a message which says no payment has been received in 180 minutes. My WHM wallet is empty. Morph says order is completed so I don’t know. Hope I didn’t lose cuz it was not a small order.
Anybody experienced same thing ? Please need help ! Thanks in advance for helping !
submitted by StrangeFlake to darknet [link] [comments]

How long do you have to wait for a pending Bitcoin transaction to return to your wallet?

I've been waiting for more than a day. I set a fee of $4, but it's not mined yet.
https://i.imgur.com/axPpWQP.png?1
the wallet is empty and the BTC is not on the receiving address. Will the transaction fail and return to the wallet?
I checked Bitcoin Accelerators but they estimated $400! to push my tx
submitted by jonbristow to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Fun with low fee TXNs on Mainnet

Here's a 0.493 sat/vB TXN I put on mainnet today. You'll have to use the SoChain block explorer to see it though. I give it a 3% chance of getting confirmed, but we'll wait and see. The TXN is a donation to [email protected] since I use their seeder for my network herder.
So last month, I voiced the unpopular opinion that node operators should lower the minrelaytxfee setting to allow low-fee TXNs to propagate more freely throughout the network. Then I asked why miners weren't mining 0.999 sat/vB TXNs during idle periods since it should be more profitable than mining no TXNs at all. Finally I wrote a node herder to walk the network looking for node operators that were running minrelaytxfee below the default (1000 sat). After walking about 26% of the network, turns out about 5% of nodes are allowing low fee TXNs.
So in that vein of discussion, I decided to just sign some low-fee TXNs and send them to the 5% of nodes I found and see what happens. To my surprise it showed up on one of the 23 block explorers I tried after broadcasting it. Surprisingly, that comes out to about 5% of explorers accepting low fee TXNs as well. So hopefully 5% or so of the miners will confirm low fee TXNs. We'll see.
BTW, to do this, this is what I did.
  1. Pair my HW wallet to Electrum
  2. Use the paytomany Electrum API to craft a TXN below 1 sat/vB
  3. Import the TXN to sign in Electrum
  4. Ran a full node with minrelaytxfee set to 1 sat (0.001 sat/vB)
  5. Walked the network to find a good number of low-fee peers
  6. Use bitcoin addnode API to herd my node to the low-fee peers I discovered.
  7. Use bitcoin sendrawtransaction API to broadcast TXN
Wait and see if it can propagate to a miner and if a miner will accept it.
BTW, there is a PR to lower the minrelaytxfee in core, but it's dragged on for years. The setting was lowered about every year or so in the early days, but hasn't been touched for many years now.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://www.reddit.com/Scams/comments/jij7zf/the_blackmail_email_scam_part_6/
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Cartel scam
You will be threatened by scammers who claim to be affiliated with a cartel. They may send you gory pictures and threaten your life and the lives of your family. Usually the victim will have attempted to contact an escort prior to the scam, but sometimes the scammers target people randomly. If you are targeted by a cartel scam all you need to do is ignore the scammers as their threats are clearly empty.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
Craigslist Carfax/vehicle history scam
You'll encounter a scammer on Craigslist who wants to buy the vehicle you have listed, but they will ask for a VIN report from a random site that they have created and they will expect you to pay for it.
Double dip/recovery scammers
This is a scam aimed at people who have already fallen for a scam previously. Scammers will reach out to the victim and claim to be able to help the victim recover funds they lost in the scam.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam part 5: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5/
PSA: you did not win a giftcard: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/fffmle/psa_you_did_not_win_a_gift_card/
Sugar scams
Sugar scammers operate all over the internet and usually come in two varieties: advance-fee scams where the scammer will ask for a payment from you before sending you lots of money, and fake check style scams where the scammer will either pull a classic fake check scam, or will do a "bill pay" style scam that involves them paying your bills, or them giving you banking information to pay your bills. If you encounter these scammers, report their accounts and move on.
Google Hangouts
Google Hangouts is a messaging platform used extensively by all kinds of scammers. If you are talking with someone online and they want you to switch to Hangouts, they are likely a scammer and you should proceed with caution.
Publishers Clearing House scams
PCH scams are often advance-fee scams, where you will be promised lots of money after you make an initial payment. You will never need to pay if you win money from the real PCH.
Pet scams
You are looking for a specific breed of puppy, bird, or other pet. You come across a nice-looking website that claims to be breeding them and has some available right now - they may even be on sale! The breeders are not local to your area (and may not even list a physical location) but they assure you they can safely ship the pet to you after a deposit or full payment. If you go through with the payment, you will likely be contacted by the "shipper" who will inform you about an unexpected shipping/customs/processing fee required to deliver your new pet. But there was never any pet, both the "breeder" and the "shipper" are scammers, typically operating out of Africa. These sites are rampant and account for a large percentage of online pet seller websites - they typically have a similar layout/template (screenshot - example)
If you are considering buying a pet online, some easy things to check are: (1) The registration date of the domain (if it was created recently it is likely a scam website) (2) Reverse image search the pictures of available pets - you will usually find other scam websites using the same photos. (3) Copy a sentence/section of the text from the "about us" page and put it into google (in quotes) - these scammers often copy large parts of their website's text from other places. (4) Search for the domain name and look for entries on petscams.com or other scam-tracking sites. (5) Strongly consider buying/adopting your pet from a local shelter or breeder where you can see the animal in person before putting any money down.
Thanks to djscsi for this entry.
Fake shipping company scams
These scams usually start when you try to buy something illegal online. You will be scammed for the initial payment, and then you will receive an email from the fake shipping company telling you that you need to pay them some sort of fee or bribe. If you pay this, they will keep trying to scam you with increasingly absurd stories until you stop paying, at which point they will blackmail you. If you are involved in this scam, all you can do is ignore the scammers and move on, and try to dispute your payments if possible.
Chinese Upwork scam
Someone will ask you to create an Upwork or other freelancer site account for them and will offer money in return. You will not be paid, and they want to use the accounts to scam people.
Quickbooks invoice scam
This is a fake check style scam that takes advantage of Quickbooks.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Digit wallet scam
A variation of the fake check scam, the scammer sends you money through a digital wallet (i.e. Venmo, Apple Pay, Zelle, Cash App) along with a message claiming they've sent the money to the wrong person and a request to send the money back. Customer service for these digital wallets may even suggest that you send the money back. However, the money sent is from a stolen credit card and will be removed from your account after a few days. Your transfer is not reversed since it came from your own funds.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

For 2 years, around 100 people have had access to my mega.nz account without me knowing it

Today i needed a txt file which i knew i had in my mega account, so i went on it and downloaded it. Something immediately started to look sketchy, the file was downloaded as a folder and my browser wouldn't even let me open it because it allegedly had a virus.

Not a big deal, i told my antivirus to let the file pass and went ahead to open it. What did i find in the folder? A txt file containing a bitcoin wallet's address and an exe file named PasswordDecoder.exe, probably a ransomware or something. Time to panic. I had documents and password stored there.

At this point, having had another account compromised in the past, i understand what's going on and move to the settings section of the site, where i can see the locations of past sessions of my account and this is what i find (didn't screenshot ALL of them but this shold give an idea of how bad the situation was) https://imgur.com/gallery/kWMVYNt

my account has probably been part of some sort of dump which is or has been available online, it's the only explanation as to why so many different people had access to it.

Past versions of my files had been erased and the bin was empty. I have contacted mega's support and i'll se if they can do something about this, i will edit this post if someone cares.
submitted by ZZazz_ to Wellthatsucks [link] [comments]

Cannot create wallet with Trezor

Hi guys, I am stuck trying to create a wallet for my Trezor with Electrum 4.0.4 on Linux:
I get to the point of entering the password twice and then selecting the path. But after that it just says
'Please wait' and then the window hangs. The only way to do something is either kill the process or send a `SIGINT` signal.
Interestingly after sending a SIGINT the window unfreezes and asks me again for the password (also during the whole freeze the Trezor device writes that I should enter my password). After entering the password again I get an empty error window and on closing it everything closes.
I started electrum with `electrum -v` to get some logs:
$ electrum -v I | logging | Electrum version: 4.0.4 - https://electrum.org - https://github.com/spesmilo/electrum I | logging | Python version: 3.8.6 (default, Sep 30 2020, 04:00:38) [GCC 10.2.0]. On platform: Linux-5.8.14-arch1-1-x86_64-with-glibc2.2.5 I | logging | Logging to file: None I | logging | Log filters: verbosity '*', verbosity_shortcuts '' I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware bitbox02: ('hardware', 'bitbox02', 'BitBox02') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware coldcard: ('hardware', 'coldcard', 'Coldcard Wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware digitalbitbox: ('hardware', 'digitalbitbox', 'Digital Bitbox wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware keepkey: ('hardware', 'keepkey', 'KeepKey wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware ledger: ('hardware', 'ledger', 'Ledger wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware safe_t: ('hardware', 'safe_t', 'Safe-T mini wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware trezor: ('hardware', 'trezor', 'Trezor wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering wallet type ('2fa', 'trustedcoin') D | util.profiler | Plugins.__init__ 0.0044 I/n | network | blockchains [0] I | exchange_rate.FxThread | using exchange CoinGecko D | util.profiler | Daemon.__init__ 0.0023 I/n | network | starting network I | daemon.Daemon | launching GUI: qt I/n | network | setting proxy None I | daemon.Daemon | starting taskgroup. I/n | network | connecting to electrumx.ftp.sh:50002:s as new interface I/n | network | starting taskgroup. I | gui.qt.history_list | could not import electrum.plot. This feature needs matplotlib to be installed. I | gui.qt.ElectrumGui | Qt GUI starting up... Qt=5.15.1, PyQt=5.15.1 I/i | interface.[localhost:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumPersonalServer 0.2.0', '1.4'] D | util.profiler | ElectrumGui.__init__ 0.1374 I/i | interface.[vmd27610.contaboserver.net:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface vmd27610.contaboserver.net:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrumx.ftp.sh:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrumx.ftp.sh:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[rbx.curalle.ovh:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/i | interface.[2AZZARITA.hopto.org:50006] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.15.0', '1.4'] I/n | network | couldn't launch iface rbx.curalle.ovh:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[2AZZARITA.hopto.org:50006] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[2AZZARITA.hopto.org:50006] | skipping header 653566 I/n | network | no height for main interface I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50750} I/i | interface.[hsmiths4fyqlw5xw.onion:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface hsmiths4fyqlw5xw.onion:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/n | network | switching to 2AZZARITA.hopto.org:50006:s I/i | interface.[electrum3.hodlister.co:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.10.0', '1.4'] I/n | network | fee_histogram [[99, 100899], [71, 112316], [61, 132563], [59, 156116], [57, 175394], [54, 114050], [51, 219092], [49, 195934], [48, 565137], [47, 781451], [46, 883591], [45, 259824], [44, 450143], [43, 114488], [42, 22100], [41, 49428], [40, 106542], [38, 151315], [33, 547095], [22, 620244], [13, 648588], [9, 822409], [5, 741398], [3, 1799486], [2, 651429]] I/n | network | fee_histogram [[99, 100899], [71, 112316], [61, 132563], [59, 156116], [57, 175394], [54, 114050], [51, 219092], [49, 195934], [48, 565137], [47, 781451], [46, 883591], [45, 259824], [44, 450143], [43, 114488], [42, 22100], [41, 49428], [40, 106542], [38, 151315], [33, 547095], [22, 620244], [13, 648588], [9, 822409], [5, 741398], [3, 1799486], [2, 651429]] I/i | interface.[bitcoin.corgi.party:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-5, 'No address associated with hostname'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface bitcoin.corgi.party:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrumx-core.1209k.com:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(OSError(101, 'Network is unreachable'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrumx-core.1209k.com:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrum3.hodlister.co:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[electrum3.hodlister.co:50002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/i | interface.[hsmiths5mjk6uijs.onion:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface hsmiths5mjk6uijs.onion:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[dxm.no-ip.biz:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(ConnectionRefusedError(111, "Connect call failed ('77.6.34.45', 50002)"))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface dxm.no-ip.biz:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrum2.eff.ro:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum2.eff.ro:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrum.hsmiths.com:50002] | disconnecting due to: ConnectError(ConnectionResetError(104, 'Connection reset by peer')) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum.hsmiths.com:50002:s -- CancelledError() I | storage.WalletStorage | wallet path /home/bene/.electrum/wallets/default_wallet I/i | interface.[bitcoin.aranguren.org:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.15.0', '1.4'] I | storage.WalletStorage | wallet path /home/bene/.electrum/wallets/default_wallet I/i | interface.[bitcoin.aranguren.org:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[bitcoin.aranguren.org:50002] | skipping header 653566 [240/1884] I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/i | interface.[localhost:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[localhost:50002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48175, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded bitbox02 I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded coldcard I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded digitalbitbox I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded keepkey I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded ledger I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded safe_t I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded trezor I | plugin.DeviceMgr | scanning devices... D | util.profiler | DeviceMgr.scan_devices 0.0244 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for bitbox02: Missing libraries for bitbox02. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for coldcard: Missing libraries for coldcard. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for keepkey: Missing libraries for keepkey. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for ledger: Missing libraries for ledger. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for safe_t: Missing libraries for safe_t. // Make sure you install it with python3 I | plugins.trezor.qt.Plugin | connecting to device at webusb:001:3 I | plugins.trezor.qt.Plugin | connected to device at webusb:001:3 I | plugin.DeviceMgr | Registering My TREZOF3342BDD7C90C7F9FBA58136 I | plugin.DeviceMgr | scanning devices... D | util.profiler | DeviceMgr.scan_devices 0.0388 I/i | interface.[localhost:50002] | skipping header 653567 qt.qpa.xcb: QXcbConnection: XCB error: 3 (BadWindow), sequence: 4028, resource id: 14687032, major code: 40 (TranslateCoords), minor code: 0 I | plugin.DeviceMgr | scanning devices... D | util.profiler | DeviceMgr.scan_devices 0.0407 
This is the point where the window freezes. Then I precc `Ctrl+C` to send a SIGINT signal and then this is the rest of the logs:
I/n | network | couldn't launch iface technetium.network:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/n | network | couldn't launch iface e2.keff.org:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum-server.ninja:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/n | network | couldn't launch iface xray587.startdedicated.de:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum.mindspot.org:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/i | interface.[electrum.leblancnet.us:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum.leblancnet.us:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[ex01.axalgo.com:50002] | succeeded in getting cert I/i | interface.[electrumx.schulzemic.net:50002] | succeeded in getting cert ^CE | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | Traceback (most recent call last): File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 446, in on_hw_derivation xpub = self.plugin.get_xpub(device_info.device.id_, derivation, xtype, self) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/plugins/trezotrezor.py", line 315, in get_xpub xpub = client.get_xpub(derivation, xtype) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/plugin.py", line 362, in wrapper return run_in_hwd_thread(partial(func, *args, **kwargs)) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/plugin.py", line 355, in run_in_hwd_thread return fut.result() File "/uslib/python3.8/concurrent/futures/_base.py", line 434, in result self._condition.wait(timeout) File "/uslib/python3.8/threading.py", line 302, in wait waiter.acquire() KeyboardInterrupt I/i | interface.[ex01.axalgo.com:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.14.0', '1.4'] I/i | interface.[electrumx.schulzemic.net:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.15.0', '1.4'] I/i | interface.[ex01.axalgo.com:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[ex01.axalgo.com:50002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/i | interface.[electrumx.schulzemic.net:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[electrumx.schulzemic.net:50002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/n | network | couldn't launch iface dragon085.startdedicated.de:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/i | interface.[btc.electroncash.dk:60002] | succeeded in getting cert I/i | interface.[mxhwmwa3nt2si4ufszm24whlpkruu74jle27ys2fyjuiifbbrub6thyd.onion:50006] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface mxhwmwa3nt2si4ufszm24whlpkruu74jle27ys2fyjuiifbbrub6thyd.onion:50006:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrum2.villocq.com:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-5, 'No address associated with hostname'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum2.villocq.com:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[btc.electroncash.dk:60002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.15.0', '1.4'] I/i | interface.[btc.electroncash.dk:60002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[btc.electroncash.dk:60002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/i | interface.[btc.electrum.bitbitnet.net:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.15.0', '1.4'] I/i | interface.[btc.electrum.bitbitnet.net:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 [169/1884] I/i | interface.[btc.electrum.bitbitnet.net:50002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I | plugin.DeviceMgr | scanning devices... D | util.profiler | DeviceMgr.scan_devices 0.0394 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for bitbox02: Missing libraries for bitbox02. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for coldcard: Missing libraries for coldcard. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for keepkey: Missing libraries for keepkey. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for ledger: Missing libraries for ledger. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for safe_t: Missing libraries for safe_t. // Make sure you install it with python3 I/i | interface.[bitcoin.aranguren.org:50002] | skipping header 653567 E | daemon.Daemon | GUI raised exception: ReRunDialog(). shutting down. I | gui.qt.ElectrumGui | closing GUI I | daemon.Daemon | shutting down network I/n | network | stopping network I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum.hodlister.co:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/n | network | couldn't launch iface orannis.com:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[localhost:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrumx.schulzemic.net:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[ex01.axalgo.com:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[2AZZARITA.hopto.org:50006] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[btc.electroncash.dk:60002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrum3.hodlister.co:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[btc.electrum.bitbitnet.net:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[bitcoin.aranguren.org:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/n | network | taskgroup stopped. I | daemon.Daemon | stopping taskgroup I | daemon.Daemon | taskgroup stopped. I | daemon.Daemon | removing lockfile I | daemon.Daemon | stopped E | __main__ | daemon.run_gui errored Traceback (most recent call last): File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/installwizard.py", line 118, in func_wrapper run_next(*out) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 193, in on_wallet_type self.run(action) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 115, in run f(*args, **kwargs) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 225, in choose_keystore self.choice_dialog(title=title, message=message, choices=choices, run_next=self.run) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/installwizard.py", line 106, in func_wrapper out = func(*args, **kwargs) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/installwizard.py", line 594, in choice_dialog self.exec_layout(vbox, title) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/installwizard.py", line 429, in exec_layout raise GoBack from None electrum.base_wizard.GoBack The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception: Traceback (most recent call last): File "/usbin/electrum", line 380, in  d.run_gui(config, plugins) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/daemon.py", line 566, in run_gui self.gui_object.main() File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/__init__.py", line 363, in main if not self.start_new_window(path, self.config.get('url'), app_is_starting=True): File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/__init__.py", line 247, in wrapper return func(self, *args, **kwargs) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/__init__.py", line 271, in start_new_window wallet = self._start_wizard_to_select_or_create_wallet(path) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/__init__.py", line 313, in _start_wizard_to_select_or_create_wallet wizard.run('new') File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 115, in run f(*args, **kwargs) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 153, in new self.choice_dialog(title=title, message=message, choices=choices, run_next=self.on_wallet_type) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/installwizard.py", line 131, in func_wrapper raise ReRunDialog() from e electrum.base_wizard.ReRunDialog I/p | plugin.Plugins | stopped 
submitted by bIacktemplar to Electrum [link] [comments]

My Localbitcoin account was terminated. I need help

Im a 2 years trader, with more 15 000 trades, 100% positive feedback, and without warning or reason LBTC decided to terminate my account.
I was working as usual and suddenly this message appeared
Dear User,**your account has been terminated.**We are informing you that your account has been terminated on 11.08.2020. Therefore, you have lost the right to use the terminated account.Please note that you are allowed to provide a receiving address for the last transaction from this account. This last transaction will empty the wallet by sending the remaining bitcoins to the given address.This last transaction must be carried out within 30 days after the account has been terminated (before 10.09.2020).Any bitcoins received after using the last transaction need to be claimed by filing a “custom work request” through our support ticket system. The custom work fee is 200 EUhour paid in Bitcoin at the current market rate. Minimum billable amount is 200 EUR.You have lost the right to use the wallet addresses assigned to your terminated account. Any bitcoins received to that wallet after 90 days from the account termination day can be claimed by filing a “custom work request” through our support ticket system. Custom work, fee is 200 EUhour paid in Bitcoin at the current market rate. Minimum billable amount is 200 EUR.
Im not able to do anything. I havent gotten on any problems with others users so I dont understand why, they are not replying my tickets.
Im a honest person, all my transaction are legit. I need a solution I dont want to lose my account, Ive work so hard for it, it is not easy to build and account like that, and this my only way to work right now.
submitted by Professional_Bread11 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Forex Investment Scams

Since my business account on Instagram reached 1000 followers, I've been getting lots of spammy messages, mostly like this one:
"I’m a Bitcoin Investor lincense by SFOX .. I make my money off crypto investment and ForexTrading.. I Work online in the Social market. all I do is move commission profit From my wallet into your account by adding your personal online account while logged from outside the account after the deposit has been verified & posted for withdrawal you keep 40%each day and send back 60%(invest back 40% and keep 60% for myself)We can do this for as long as your are 100% trustworthy"
"I gon deposit $3k for being our first deal and if you keep your words,I will increase it to $5k and we can keep it that way famz, I can get profit only twice a week and I will be deposit $5k to on every deposit after our first transaction goes well and trustworthy, we can eat together for long if you keep to your words.I’ll need the following details to make the deposit into your account;
Full name on the account: Username: Password: Phone No:"
This goes on to say it can be an empty account as long as we are both honest"
I'm curious, what is the actual scam here? Is it gaining from moving money around through microtransactions (like some weird online money laundering thing?
Is it illegal investment that he wants to not use his own account for?
Is it just trying to get personal info?
What do you guys think?
submitted by HappensByChance to NoStupidQuestions [link] [comments]

Recovering an old wallet -- was it ever used?

I found my old wallet.dat file on a hard drive, and opened it using pywallet. I'm seeing:
"bestblock": "redacted"
"defaultkey": "redacted",
"keys": [redacted - many are listed, with public, private, etc.],
"names": {redacted},
"pool": [101 different addresses]
"tx": [] <-- Empty array
Does the empty transactions array mean that there was never any money put into it? Or is it worth it to keep sleuthing to see if there's any BTC in there? The debug.log file does contain this at the beginning:
Loading wallet... nFileVersion = XXX fGenerateBitcoins = 0 nTransactionFee = 0 
followed by the addition of those 101 key pools and DNS addresses, but then I'm not seeing any other instances of fGenerateBitcoins, just a long series of got inventory: block XXXX, askfor tx XXX [with values in columns A and B), etc. which I'm guessing are just validating other transactions happening on the chain. There are two Block (blk000X.dat) files also.
Am I SOL or should I keep sleuthing? N00b here, thanks for the input.
submitted by gardenfractals to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

RIP HAL FINNEY "His last post on a BTC Forum"

I thought I'd write about the last four years, an eventful time for Bitcoin and me.
For those who don't know me, I'm Hal Finney. I got my start in crypto working on an early version of PGP, working closely with Phil Zimmermann. When Phil decided to start PGP Corporation, I was one of the first hires. I would work on PGP until my retirement. At the same time, I got involved with the Cypherpunks. I ran the first cryptographically based anonymous remailer, among other activities.
Fast forward to late 2008 and the announcement of Bitcoin. I've noticed that cryptographic graybeards (I was in my mid 50's) tend to get cynical. I was more idealistic; I have always loved crypto, the mystery and the paradox of it.
When Satoshi announced Bitcoin on the cryptography mailing list, he got a skeptical reception at best. Cryptographers have seen too many grand schemes by clueless noobs. They tend to have a knee jerk reaction.
I was more positive. I had long been interested in cryptographic payment schemes. Plus I was lucky enough to meet and extensively correspond with both Wei Dai and Nick Szabo, generally acknowledged to have created ideas that would be realized with Bitcoin. I had made an attempt to create my own proof of work based currency, called RPOW. So I found Bitcoin facinating.
When Satoshi announced the first release of the software, I grabbed it right away. I think I was the first person besides Satoshi to run bitcoin. I mined block 70-something, and I was the recipient of the first bitcoin transaction, when Satoshi sent ten coins to me as a test. I carried on an email conversation with Satoshi over the next few days, mostly me reporting bugs and him fixing them.
Today, Satoshi's true identity has become a mystery. But at the time, I thought I was dealing with a young man of Japanese ancestry who was very smart and sincere. I've had the good fortune to know many brilliant people over the course of my life, so I recognize the signs.
After a few days, bitcoin was running pretty stably, so I left it running. Those were the days when difficulty was 1, and you could find blocks with a CPU, not even a GPU. I mined several blocks over the next days. But I turned it off because it made my computer run hot, and the fan noise bothered me. In retrospect, I wish I had kept it up longer, but on the other hand I was extraordinarily lucky to be there at the beginning. It's one of those glass half full half empty things.
The next I heard of Bitcoin was late 2010, when I was surprised to find that it was not only still going, bitcoins actually had monetary value. I dusted off my old wallet, and was relieved to discover that my bitcoins were still there. As the price climbed up to real money, I transferred the coins into an offline wallet, where hopefully they'll be worth something to my heirs.
Speaking of heirs, I got a surprise in 2009, when I was suddenly diagnosed with a fatal disease. I was in the best shape of my life at the start of that year, I'd lost a lot of weight and taken up distance running. I'd run several half marathons, and I was starting to train for a full marathon. I worked my way up to 20+ mile runs, and I thought I was all set. That's when everything went wrong.
My body began to fail. I slurred my speech, lost strength in my hands, and my legs were slow to recover. In August, 2009, I was given the diagnosis of ALS, also called Lou Gehrig's disease, after the famous baseball player who got it.
ALS is a disease that kills moter neurons, which carry signals from the brain to the muscles. It causes first weakness, then gradually increasing paralysis. It is usually fatal in 2 to 5 years. My symptoms were mild at first and I continued to work, but fatigue and voice problems forced me to retire in early 2011. Since then the disease has continued its inexorable progression.
Today, I am essentially paralyzed. I am fed through a tube, and my breathing is assisted through another tube. I operate the computer using a commercial eyetracker system. It also has a speech synthesizer, so this is my voice now. I spend all day in my power wheelchair. I worked up an interface using an arduino so that I can adjust my wheelchair's position using my eyes.
It has been an adjustment, but my life is not too bad. I can still read, listen to music, and watch TV and movies. I recently discovered that I can even write code. It's very slow, probably 50 times slower than I was before. But I still love programming and it gives me goals. Currently I'm working on something Mike Hearn suggested, using the security features of modern processors, designed to support "Trusted Computing", to harden Bitcoin wallets. It's almost ready to release. I just have to do the documentation.
And of course the price gyrations of bitcoins are entertaining to me. I have skin in the game. But I came by my bitcoins through luck, with little credit to me. I lived through the crash of 2011. So I've seen it before. Easy come, easy go.
That's my story. I'm pretty lucky overall. Even with the ALS, my life is very satisfying. But my life expectancy is limited. Those discussions about inheriting your bitcoins are of more than academic interest. My bitcoins are stored in our safe deposit box, and my son and daughter are tech savvy. I think they're safe enough. I'm comfortable with my legacy.
submitted by Cxesar to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Official - YouTube US FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS DISCOVER WAY TO CONTROL BITCOIN! Will Institutions centralize Bitcoin? Uploads from Bitcoin Official - YouTube FaucetHub to Coinbase Bitcoin Transfer Bangla Tutorial 2019 How to Create ethereum wallet using coinbase_eth wallet create

Bitcoin Mining. If you’ve ever thought or heard someone say that because Bitcoin is purely digital, then it’s possible to create as many new Bitcoin units as you want, similar to the way we can, for example, play a photo or song file and have it available for our disposal in our wallet. Yesterday i just reinstalled ledger wallet bitcoin and it worked well but my balance is empty !!!! BTC and BCH. And i am on the same boat with dogecoin, XLM onStellar account viewer and my ETH on myether wallet !!! The support just answered me to reset application data and to reinstall wallet but it doesn't change anything. I am very stressed and really don't know what to do. p.s :My ledger is ... Is Bitcoin Safe To Use?📉📛 The 5 Biggest risks of using Bitcoin While many investors rejoice when the price of Bitcoin increasing by 30% in a matter of hours, it is an entire different story if you are trying to use Bitcoin for everyday transactions and it crashes 60% overnight. My node is currently syncing Tried emptying out receiving addresses and was successful but there are still more coins in ... bitcoin-core electrum unconfirmed-transactions synchronization wallet-recovery. asked Jan 7 at 16:07. requim. 1 4 4 bronze badges. 0. votes. 2answers 71 views how do you transfer your Bitcoin core wallet while syncing? I would like to transfer my btc wallet to an ... This is my personal arrangement to provide a useful format for discussing and disseminating breaking news and information. Opinions posted here are not necessarily my own. If you are offended by wide open discussions of news, life, politics and religious things, and God's word, kindly get out of here NOW. At times sources quoted here are suspect at best. I try to make sure they are correct ...

[index] [37823] [26810] [33472] [15035] [20248] [48138] [18320] [9055] [14508] [4504]

Bitcoin Official - YouTube

Status Paying 100% Genuine Trusted App Today Join you my referral promotion link and Get a FREE Bonus 0.005 BITCOIN to withdraw minimum 0.05 BTC without withdrawal fees Your Wallet Address must be ... Signup here : https://goo.gl/WepHth Best Bitcoin Cloud Mining mit 50 GHS Hashpower - Bezahlen seit 2014 Was ist Cryptomining Farm? CryptominingFarm ist ein Bitcoin-Mining-Unternehmen und eine ... I will be showing you how to set up a Ledger Nano S Cryptocurrency hardware wallet so you can safely store your Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies on an offl... This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue. Watch Queue Queue Queue The most popular bitcoin and other cryptocurrency related content on Youtube with your host Adam Guerbuez AKA MikeTheMug. Learn the ways to making life chang...

#